A Journey Through State Street's History

Tour curated by: Sharmila Porter

The Walking Tour takes you on a historical journey through State Street Albany, NY. The tour will take approximately 17 minutes and is a family friendly entertainment. Anyone is welcomed to take this tour, it can range from a person who’s on their lunch break to a person who’s curious to learn more about an Albany neighborhood. The Walking Tour takes you to five different locations, it begins on State and Broadway and ends on 239 State Street. The underlying theme of this tour is “What was the building before?” Some of the locations we visit might be familiar and other might not. What is important to notice during the tour is that each building we visit served a different purpose in the 19th and 20th century than the purpose it serves as today. By taking this tour I hope each individual not only enjoy the tour, but see the evolution that State Street has made.

Locations for Tour

The first location on the walking tour is the D&H Building, today known as the SUNY Administration building. When William Barnes, a republican took power in Albany as a political boss his first objective was to better the water front view. For…

The second location on this tour is The National Commercial Bank, now known as Key Bank. When the bank was first established in November 25, 1838, under the General Banking Act it was simply known as the Commercial Bank. However on June 13, 1864 the…

State and Pearl Street intersection was one of Albany’s main crossroads during the 18th century. This intersection known as The Old Elm Tree corner represented a well-known historical landmark. As a matter of fact Philip Livingston, signer of…

The fourth location on the walking tour is initially known as the Wellington Hotel a part of the "Wellington Row." Unfortunately, when the hotel first opened in 1905 the establishment did not achieve the initial success it later received. In the…

This is the last location on our walking tour, and here we are facing a building which many of you may think is insignificant. I want you to image that in 1851 the Albany Law School opened its doors at this very same location. In 1929, the Law School…